Lumber Species

Ash

Description:
  • The heartwood is a light to medium brown color. Sapwood can be very wide, and tends to be a beige or light brown; not always clearly or sharply defined from heartwood.
  • Has a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is almost always straight and regular, though sometimes moderately curly or figured boards can be found.
  • Produces good results with hand or machine tools. Responds well to steam bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.
 
Main Uses:
  • Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, furniture, doors, cabinets, and paneling. 

Cottonwood

Description:
  • Heartwood tends to be a light brown. Sapwood is a pale yellow to nearly white and tends to gradually blend into the heartwood.
  • Grain is generally straight to slightly irregular or interlocked. Uniform medium texture with low natural luster.
  • Easy to work with hand and machine tools. Responds poorly to steam bending. Dries easily with a slight tendency to warp
 
Main Uses:
  • Furniture, furniture parts, boxes/crates, and various specialty purposes.

Elm

Description:
  • Heartwood is light to medium reddish brown. Paler sapwood is usually well defined.
  • Grain is interlocked, with a somewhat coarse, uneven texture.
  • Glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending, and holds nails and screws well. Can be a challenge to work because of interlocked grain.
 
Main Uses:
  • Furniture, cabinets, flooring, paneling, boxes and baskets. 

Hickory

Description:
  • Heartwood tends to be light to medium brown, with a reddish hue; sapwood is a paler yellowish brown. Boards with contrasting heartwood and sapwood create a somewhat rustic appearance.
  • Grain is usually straight, though occasionally wavy, with a medium texture.
  • Glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending. Can be difficult to work with hand tools.
 
Main Uses:
  • Cabinets, tool handles, ladder rungs, wheel spokes, and flooring, 

Hard Maple

Description:
  • Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of Hard Maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. The heartwood tends to be a darker reddish brown.
  • Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.
  • Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Turns, glues, and finishes well. 
Main Uses:
  • Flooring, furniture, cabinets, paneling, musical instruments, cutting boards, doors and moulding.

Sap Gum

Description:
  • Wide sapwood is whitish to light pink or tan color, and is sometimes referred to as “sapgum." Heartwood is gray to reddish brown, and is commonly referred to as “redgum.” 
  • Grain is interlocked, with a very fine, uniform texture. Good natural luster.
  • Easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Turns, glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds moderately well to steam bending.
Main Uses:
  • Cabinets, furniture parts, doors, interior trim, boxes/crates, and turned objects.

Red Oak

Description:
  • Heartwood is a light to medium brown, commonly with a reddish cast. Nearly white to light brown sapwood is not always sharply defined from the heartwood. 
  • Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture 
  • Produces good results with hand and machine tools. Responds well to steam-bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.
Main Uses:
  • Cabinetry, furniture, flooring, moulding, interior trim, doors, and paneling, 

White Oak

Description:
  • Heartwood is a light to medium brown, commonly with an olive cast. Nearly white to light brown sapwood is not always sharply defined from the heartwood. 
  • Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture. 
  • Produces good results with hand and machine tools. Responds well to steam-bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.
Main Uses:
  • Cabinetry, furniture, flooring, moulding, interior trim, doors, barrels, and paneling.

Poplar

Description:
  • Heartwood is light cream to yellowish brown, with occasional streaks of gray or green. Sapwood is pale yellow to white, not always clearly defined from the heartwood.
  • Poplar typically has a straight, uniform grain, with a medium texture. Low natural luster.
  • Very easy to work in almost all regards. Dries easily and holds paint and stain well.
Main Uses:
  • Furniture, furniture parts, cabinets, doors, paneling, moulding, and millwork.

  © 2017 Wood Holley Lumber Company. All rights reserved.